"Adler & Hearne Live At Eddie's Attic" REVIEW in County Line Magazine

Hats off to County Line Magazine and editor Tom Geddie for publishing a review of our latest live recording.

Adler & Hearne

Live at Eddie’s Attic

Spring Hollow Records

The word “sweet” always comes to mind when Adler & Hearne perform, soon followed by the words “sense of humor.” Both of those descriptions fit Lynn Adler and Lindy Hearne’s new CD, Live at Eddie’s Attic.

The acoustic CD is folk, bordering a couple of times on Appalachian. The harmonies are heartfelt; the playing is mostly simple and crisp. Like on many live albums, there are a few minor technical glitches, but not enough to intrude into the in-the-moment experience.

Lynn and Lindy founded one of the Upper East Side of Texas’ best listening rooms, Crossroads Coffeehouse and Music Company in Winnsboro, before passing it on to others so they could go on the road sharing their own music. One of their shows was at Eddie's Attic, which bills itself as the premier listening room in the Atlanta area and has hosted John Mayer, The Civil Wars, the Indigo Girls, John Gorka, Sheryl Crow, Ani DiFranco, Ellis Paul, Patty Larkin, Malcolm Holcombe, Eric Taylor, Billy Joe Shaver, India.Arie, and more including, yes, Justin Bieber.

On 11 songs, Adler & Hearne carry listeners through love, heartbreak, social consciousness, two fairly unique takes on gospel, and more.

“The Egg’s Lament,” written by Hearne and sung without a hint of a smile by the duo, fits in with their desire to, like the egg, find their destiny: “Whatever I am, I’m still feeling stuck,” the sing. “Just one big push and I’ll have it made, been safe for too long, I’ve gotta get laid.”

Other highlights include “Put Me on the Stove (and call me done),” which finds the song’s protagonist wishing to be an onion in the stew that is Jesus, a raisin in Jesus’ dough, a catfish in Jesus’ frying pan, etc.; “Prayin’ for the Camel,” in which a man, taking the biblical proverb to heart, says he will pray on the day that he dies for the camel to squeeze on through; and the gently sung protest song “A Hundred Years from Now” which condemns ecological waste with the phrase “go ahead, pass the buck, burn the bridge, best of luck.”

The most Appalachian of the songs is “Stranger in the House,” which the couple wrote with Hal Greenwood: “I’m a stranger in the house of love, it’s a place I’ve been but I don’t belong.”

Which, listening to Lynn and Lindy together, is obviously not true.

– Tom Geddie 

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