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Adler & Hearne: NEWS

Yes. We know -- we are embarrassingly behind in posting our latest NEWS! - July 3, 2015

Admittedly, the day-to-day life of the fulltime touring duo Adler & Hearne is such that yours trulies are TRULY behind in this department. We've had quite a bit of lovely news to share -- and often get things 'shared' on our Facebook pages faster than we post here on our web site these days. If you truly care about such news, please DO sign up to be on our email list (though don't expect to be bombarded by emails either). And also, if you are on Facebook - that's a great way for us to keep up with one another. We're on there as Lynn Adler and Lindy Hearne, and we also have an Adler & Hearne page you can LIKE!

Thanks for looking here on our NEWS page, and maybe one of these days -- we'll get caught up. But don't hold your breath.  : )

 

Adler & Hearne at Sleder's 'On The Porch' (Traverse City Record-Eagle, April 19, 2013) - April 19, 2013

April 19, 2013

Adler & Hearne at Sleder's 'On the Porch' Sunday

TRAVERSE CITY — Sleder’s Family Tavern’s On the Porch concert series presents Adler & Hearne in concert Sunday at 4 p.m.

From their Spring Hollow Organic Song Farm in the pine woods outside the rural arts hamlet of Winnsboro, Texas, Lynn Adler and Lindy Hearne offer music of the folk-jazz-blues variety.

“We call ourselves ‘organic song farmers,’” said Lynn via email. “We’ve played a number of house concerts in the area — ones where we’ve mostly ‘planted’ ourselves, including an annual one we play in Suttons Bay with dear friends there.”

They’ve also played at various churches in the area and for the past two years, have been volunteer musicians at the Traverse City Film Festival. They were also hired to be the featured entertainment at last year’s festival Founder’s Party and have been featured on Sandy Blumenfeld’s “American Crossroads” show on WNMC.

Adler and Hearne first met in Nashville while pursuing solo musical careers. Years later, their paths crossed in Texas, where they formed their duo. Now the award-winning songwriters and national touring artists have returned to the city where they first met to record their debut album, “To The Heart.” It’s a collection of 13 songs that one critic described as feeling “like a slice of life taken directly from Adler & Hearne, and offered up to enjoy and experience.”

Tickets for the performance are $15 in advance and $20 at the door, available in Traverse City at Oryana Food Cooperative, Brilliant Books and Sleder’s. To purchase or for more information, call 947-9213.

The duo will also play at the Brookside Inn in Beulah April 27 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 advance, $20 on the day of the show, from Brookside Inn, Sugar Moon Cafe, East Shore Market and The Corner Drug in Frankfort. For more information, call 882-9688 or visit www.brooksideinn.com.

 

Crossroads of Culture -- Art, music, cuisine - and a sense of whimsy - come together in downtown Winnsboro (Texas Highways magazine Jan. 2013) - December 15, 2012

Here is a delightful story that appeared in the January 2013 issue of TEXAS HIGHWAYS magazine about our hometown of Winnsboro, including a nice mention of yours trulies Adler & Hearne!

http://www.texashighways.com/culture-lifestyle/item/272-crossroads-of-culture-winnsboro

ENJOY!!!

Organic Song Farming (Free Times Press, Chattanooga) - November 2, 2012

http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2012/nov/01/organic-song-farming/

Here's a link to a nice article that appeared in the Free Times Press in Chattanoogo in advance of our show there at the famed Charles & Myrtle's Coffeehouse. And following is a cut and paste of the content:

ORGANIC SONG FARMING

There is a sense of rooted personality to the music of Lynn Adler and Lindy Hearne, a feeling of place that is tied up in every lyric and note.

Song to song, the husband-and-wife singers/songwriters seek to bring listeners into their lives to share in their joys and trials with music that is equally inspired by life on the road and on their 18-acre farm in Winnsboro, Texas.

The couple are self-described "organic song farmers," which Adler said is in reference to being open to inspiration and planting the seeds for their music whenever the opportunity arises.

"Songs come at you from all directions, and the main thing is that you show up and pay attention," she said. "It's all organic to our lives. We feel like if we sing about things we feel strongly about, it will stir others."

Texas is a melting pot of musical styles, and Adler and Hearne's music samples it all, from the blues of the pine-carpeted eastern hills to the folksy twang of the state's western reaches. That wide-ranging approach has helped them become finalists in several songwriting competitions throughout the region.

Saturday, Nov. 3, the couple will once again give Chattanoogans an ear into their lives when they take the stage at Charles & Myrtle's Coffeehouse. The show will be their first since making their debut at the venue last year with Minneapolis-based singer/songwriter Michael Johnson.

Adler said she and Hearne love smaller rooms because they offer a chance to connect even more intimately with their listeners. Seeking out and embracing those moments is key to growing for grassroots, independent musicians, she said.

"We're building our momentum," Adler said. "We're building our audience one room and one concert at a time."

Contact Casey Phillips at cphillips@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6205. Follow him on Twitter at @Phillips CTFP.

Winnsboro Art Center to honor Adler, Hearne - September 1, 2012

We're humbled to be honored in this way. Thank you to the Winnsboro Center for the Arts for naming Adler & Hearne the 2012 recipients of the TRAILS COUNTRY TREASURE AWARD. Wow. That is really cool!

http://www.countylinemagazine.com/September-2012/Winnsboro-Art-Center-to-Honor-Adler-Hearne/

Here's a cut and paste of the content:

WINNSBORO ART CENTER TO HONOR ADLER, HEARNE

Winnsboro’s best known singer-songwriter duo, Lynn Adler and Lindy Hearne, will be presented the Trails Country Treasure Award on September 23 at Winnsboro Center for the Arts. The reception is at 2 p.m.

Lynn and Lindy founded Crossroads Coffeehouse and Music Company in Winnsboro, turning it into a one of the best acoustic venues in the Upper East Side of Texas before passing it along to other folks because they wanted to spend more time traveling around the country singing their own songs and a few covers for more people.

They call their music a spirited blend of organic folk-jazz blues-grass.

“We write in a variety of styles and genres, and are comfortable as performers in crisscrossing back and forth across those lines,” Lynn said.

Both have been influenced by their time in Winnsboro, and by their parents.

For Lindy, it was primarily his father “because of his musical ability, his kindness, his accepting ways, and just how he encouraged me musically my entire life. He was always fine with whatever I chose to do musically. He knew that music was first with me, and he was encouraging and accepting of that always. He wasn’t so verbal about it, but I always felt he approved of what I was doing.”

For Lynn, it was both of her parents “because of their musical ability, too. But also there are the effects of their diverse personality and character traits that are like threads I see running through my own ways of doing things. My dad has and continues to be a huge influence – muse even – to my music making. And my mom influences my life in the day-to-day moments, in ways big and small.”

Crossroads, the venue that Lynn and Lindy founded, will host Rhett Butler in an encore performance at 7:30 p.m. on September 8 at the art center, which also hosts an exhibit and sale by the In Focus Photography Club.

On October 30, the center will present its own production of “The War of the Worlds” radio broadcast originally aired on radio in 1938 as a dramatization of the H.G. Wells novel of the same name, unintentionally sparking panic and hysteria across America.

Winnsboro Center for the Arts is at 200 Market and Hwy 11. For more information, call 903.342.0686 or go to www.winnsborocenterforthearts.com.

 

Adler & Hearne score a knockout at Uncle Calvin's - June 24, 2012

Here's Dallas Morning News writer Michael Granberry's review of the night we headlined at Uncle Calvin's Coffeehouse in Dallas on Friday, June 22, 2012...

http://popcultureblog.dallasnews.com/2012/06/we-were-there-adler-hearne-score-a-knockout-at-uncle-calvins.html/

And here's a cut and paste of the content of the review!:

WE WERE THERE: ADLER & HEARNE SCORE A KNOCKOUT AT UNCLE CALVIN'S

Duets done well are extraordinary musical creations. Duets showcase individual voices, but in their finest moments, they merge two voices that somehow create a third. The best examples include the Everly Brothers, Simon and Garfunkel, Tammy Wynette and George Jones.

Adler & Hearne is the duo of Lynn Adler and Lindy Hearne, who grew up in Protestant homes where church music was a family calling. Adler became a budding gospel singer and songwriter, who wrote a song covered by Debby Boone. She also co-wrote the theme song for the PBS children’s series, Wishbone. And last year, as the only female finalist, she won the 23rd annual B.W. Stevenson Singer-Songwriter Memorial Competition at Poor David’s Pub.

Hearne traveled extensively with country legend Roy Clark, with whom he appeared on the TV comedy Hee Haw, on the Tonight Show and in the acoustic wonderland of Carnegie Hall. He’s also an impeccable songwriter who can play the daylights out of his battered, Willie Nelson-like guitar.

From 2005 to 2009, Adler & Hearne ran Crossroads Coffeehouse & Music Co. in Winnsboro in the Piney Woods, importing to their little corner of deep East Texas such talents as Jimmy LaFave, John Gorka, Ruthie Foster and Kinky Friedman.

Lucky for us, Adler & Hearne had dreams of their own. They recently released their third album, Live at Eddie’s Attic. Since 2009, they have toured extensively, from the East Coast to the West, from the Deep South to the Upper Midwest. Friday night, they arrived in Dallas, gracing Uncle Calvin’s Coffeehouse with three fast-moving hours of exquisite music. Making the show even more memorable was Kate Hearne, Lindy’s multi-talented daughter, a gifted guitar player and vocalist who opened the show, then added her own electric-guitar wizardry to Adler & Hearne’s set. During the warm-up portion, Kate got expert backing from talented bassist Garrett Paine Gridley, who at one point offered a terrific instrumental solo that drew a rousing ovation.

Adler & Hearne opened the main set with the moving ballad “River Wide, River Deep,” during which they solved the secret to a good duet, finding the elusive third voice that powered more than 20 songs with blissful harmonies. Hearne, who teaches guitar to aspiring students in Fort Worth, provided terrific string work with that battered instrument that added its own rare sound to the evening’s mix.

Adler & Hearne’s second song “Stranger in the House of Love” underscored the power of their ability to craft duets. But it also highlighted the distinction of each singer’s individual voice. Adler’s passionate lyric touches blend beautifully with Hearne’s mellow baritone.

Hearne has written many songs over the years with Hal Greenwood, one being a quirky gospel song titled “Put Me On the Stove” that contains the lines, “I’ll be the onion, you be the stew, put me on the stove and call me done.” Great to hear it Friday night. Hearne and Greenwood, who was part of the near-capacity crowd at Uncle Calvin’s, have collaborated on dozens of memorable tunes over the years.

The other remarkable aspect of the Adler-Hearne show was the duo’s range. They offer an eclectic mix that covers gospel, jazz, blues, singer-songwriter confessional tunes, even sweet moments of heavenly cabaret. Adler the singer-songwriter scored heavily with “Alarms,” which offers solace to anyone who can’t help letting a badly needed paycheck trump passion. This is an example of the power of her lyrics:

We muster up the will to do the things we must.

We hold our tears and leave our dreams to rust.

We count the hours. We make the list.

We cash the check. We wonder what we missed.

She worked a series of 9-to-5 jobs before being able to follow her dream, with Hearne by her side, and the joy they share comes through in every note of every song.

Humor also is an Adler & Hearne strong suit. Hearne’s “The Egg’s Lament” is downright hilarious, with its punch line being something we can’t even quote in a family newspaper (or in one of its blog items). “Prayin’ for the Camel,” a rich man’s plea to let him into heaven, was another light diversion that added balance to a powerful ensemble of songs. Adler led the way on “A Hundred Years from Now,” another searing ballad that, in addition to movingly memorable lyrics, offered a breezy Brazilian blues feel.

If anything, the Adler-Hearne show was like an East Texas buffet of killer desserts. Think musical versions of blackberry cobbler and banana pudding. Rounding out the spread was “Hollerin’ the Hills,” a tribute to the Piney Woods and the 18 acres where Adler and Hearne live, a place they call the Spring Hollow Organic Song Farm. Hearne took the lead on “Addicted to You,” a marvelous ode to love gone wrong that contains the line “I wish they had a patch for you.”

The versatility extended to instrumentation, with Hearne adding harmonica and mandolin to his fine old friend, the guitar.

In all, it was yet another show adding to the legacy of Uncle Calvin’s, which later this year celebrates its 30th anniversary. It’s no secret to some of us why a musical such as Once all but swept the recent Tony awards. Once is not Oklahoma! or South Pacific. It’s folk music, or as Adler calls it, “music of the heart,” which fills a need in these troubled times better than any. With commercial radio full of crap — Hearne offered one tune that extolled the glory days of Top 40, which we all miss — it’s a healing experience to hear such a duo as Adler & Hearne. Individually, they’re terrific, but their talents call to mind the TV commercial that thrived during the Top 40 era: “Two mints are better than one.”

In their case, two voices form a musical mint that really is better than one, as Adler & Hearne proved over and over in a memorably moving Uncle Calvin’s evening.

 

"Adler & Hearne Live At Eddie's Attic" REVIEW in County Line Magazine - January 1, 2012

Hats off to County Line Magazine and editor Tom Geddie for publishing a review of our latest live recording.

Adler & Hearne

Live at Eddie’s Attic

Spring Hollow Records

The word “sweet” always comes to mind when Adler & Hearne perform, soon followed by the words “sense of humor.” Both of those descriptions fit Lynn Adler and Lindy Hearne’s new CD, Live at Eddie’s Attic.

The acoustic CD is folk, bordering a couple of times on Appalachian. The harmonies are heartfelt; the playing is mostly simple and crisp. Like on many live albums, there are a few minor technical glitches, but not enough to intrude into the in-the-moment experience.

Lynn and Lindy founded one of the Upper East Side of Texas’ best listening rooms, Crossroads Coffeehouse and Music Company in Winnsboro, before passing it on to others so they could go on the road sharing their own music. One of their shows was at Eddie's Attic, which bills itself as the premier listening room in the Atlanta area and has hosted John Mayer, The Civil Wars, the Indigo Girls, John Gorka, Sheryl Crow, Ani DiFranco, Ellis Paul, Patty Larkin, Malcolm Holcombe, Eric Taylor, Billy Joe Shaver, India.Arie, and more including, yes, Justin Bieber.

On 11 songs, Adler & Hearne carry listeners through love, heartbreak, social consciousness, two fairly unique takes on gospel, and more.

“The Egg’s Lament,” written by Hearne and sung without a hint of a smile by the duo, fits in with their desire to, like the egg, find their destiny: “Whatever I am, I’m still feeling stuck,” the sing. “Just one big push and I’ll have it made, been safe for too long, I’ve gotta get laid.”

Other highlights include “Put Me on the Stove (and call me done),” which finds the song’s protagonist wishing to be an onion in the stew that is Jesus, a raisin in Jesus’ dough, a catfish in Jesus’ frying pan, etc.; “Prayin’ for the Camel,” in which a man, taking the biblical proverb to heart, says he will pray on the day that he dies for the camel to squeeze on through; and the gently sung protest song “A Hundred Years from Now” which condemns ecological waste with the phrase “go ahead, pass the buck, burn the bridge, best of luck.”

The most Appalachian of the songs is “Stranger in the House,” which the couple wrote with Hal Greenwood: “I’m a stranger in the house of love, it’s a place I’ve been but I don’t belong.”

Which, listening to Lynn and Lindy together, is obviously not true.

– Tom Geddie 

Adler & Hearne Voted "Best Of Upper East Side of Texas 2011" by County Line Magazine readers - January 1, 2012

Best of the Upper East Side of Texas 2011 and Hall of Fame Winners Announced

More than 2,000 votes were cast this year for County Line Magazine’s annual Best of the Upper East Side of Texas, which highlights some of the best food, entertainment, art, music, lodging, attractions, and more in Northeast Texas.

...In the Best of the Upper East Side of Texas 2011 poll Winnsboro won the most categories for the third year in a row and a few runner up spots...

Best local band winner is blacktopGYPSY with runners up Slightly Tilted and Diddley Squat, and best local singer/songwriter goes to duo Adler & Hearne and runners up Matt Bradshaw and Heather Little.

NOTE FROM A&H: We're honored always to be featured in any way in County Line Magazine. Hats off to the readers for this nod -- we didn't even know such a category exists!

 

Lindy Hearne Photography Exhibit Announced - January 1, 2011

Lindy's photo exhibit poster.

The following arts calendar feature appeared in the January 2011 "Best Of" issue of County Line Magazine. Our thanks to Winnsboro Center for the Arts for hosting the exhibit, which runs from November 19, 2010 through January 22, 2011.  | Lindy's photos now enjoy exposure in a number of shops and restaurants in downtown Winnsboro, including our own Adler & Hearne Store (the land of "ahs") just inside the front door of Main Street Antiques & Collectibles, across from Art & Espresso and Brewbaker's Restaurant & Pub (two of our favorite, local live-music venues -- in addition to Crossroads of course, which we founded in 2005). | When you're passing through Winnsboro, stop in and enjoy our quirky collection of music, photos, and of course -- antique, retro and vintage finds. (Open Mondays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.) Here's the news as it read in the County Line:

Images with deep roots in rural East Texas are on display at Winnsboro Center for the Arts (WCA) through January 22 in an exhibit by photographer and touring songwriter Lindy Hearne. Hearne finds inspiration for his photos and his songs from the ordinary to the extraordinary. The exhibit includes glimpses from his East Texas piney woods home outside Winnsboro, to images captured ‘on the road.’ Plus a few song lyrics thrown in for good measure.

The exhibit features framed and matted fine art prints, and photo note cards, and the works are available for purchase with a portion of the proceeds benefiting the art center.

WCA exhibit hours are Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and during special events. It’s recommended that patrons call the volunteer-managed art center to verify hours of operation at 903.342.0686.

Winnsboro Center for the Arts is at 200 N. Market St., across Broadway (Hwy 11) from the Winnsboro Depot. Winnsboro is an official State of Texas Cultural Arts District.

 

KETR's Notably Texan radio host Matt Meinke features Adler & Hearne in a one-hour interview - July 29, 2010

http://stream.publicbroadcasting.net/production/mp3/ketr/local-ketr-915820.mp3

Click the link above to hear the interview!

KETR "Notably Texan" radio host Matt Meinke produced a detail-packed, one-hour interview of Adler & Hearne, broadcast on July 29, 2010. Link above to listen. Better yet -- cut and paste the link into a separate browser to enjoy listening while you continue to explore our site.

KETR's Notably Texan radio program logo

KETR is "our" National Public Radio station, located on the campus of Texas A&M in Commerce (just about 40 miles northwest of our home). Hats off to Matt Meinke and all the other fine radio folks out there in the world who work so hard to keep music aLIVE and well in the world by helping music like ours find its way to the ears of folks like YOU!

 

 

Lynn Adler named winner of 22nd Annual B.W. Stevenson Memorial Singer-Songwriter Competition - May 13, 2010

God bless David Card. For 22 years, through this special memorial event, he has given the world -- especially the singer-songwriter community -- the opportunity to pay homage to the high-and-honey-voiced BW Stevenson, who passed away at the too-young age of 38 while undergoing heart valve surgery on April 28, 1988.

Buckwheat's spirit was most definitely felt in the house on Wednesday night, April 28, 2010, as 12 semifinalists (a rare imbalance of 11 gentleman singer-songwriters plus yours truly's Lynn Adler) performed their two song submissions that won them their spots in the semifinal 12.

  Lynn sings her anthem to PDA at Poor David's BW Stevenson Memorial Singer-Songwriter semifinals.

Lynn joins David Card and the other 5 finalists on stage at the close of the evening.

Lynn singing

Lynn Adler was named among the final 6, and performed two songs, plus two more originals before three judges and the famed Poor David's audience on Wednesday, May 12, 2010. At the end of the evening Lynn was speechless and all-smiles at being named "winner" of the event. Songwriter Scott Fant was named Runner Up.

Lynn's finals night performance, May 12, 2010.

 

Here are some of Lynn's words to the wise about entering song contests and such...

"Take the fresh bragging rights where you can get 'em! But when you don't make the cut, take it with an ample dose of salt. God knows, I've either never made the cut, or been in my share of situations where I've only made the 'semi-finals.' For years, my joke about myself has been that of being dubbed 'most talented non-finalist.' 

 Lynn has a laugh with the Poor David's audience.

"Regardless of what happens, don't let it shake your passion for your art. Smile to yourself that you got up on the stage and shared your songs with the world. That's really what it's about. That, and growing your relationships within the greater music community. Not the judging, the being judged, or the tallied results. That part is all subjective, and a matter of opinion.

"Somebody said '...that which does not kill us makes us stronger...' (or something like that). It's true. I was shaking in my boots both nights of this event. Happily, I'm used to singing and playing music with Lindy. But it's good to stay strong on your own. You bring more to your other musical relationships that way. I'm glad I pushed through my fears and insecurities to enter this event. I made new friends through the experience. I gained new courage and self confidence. And I won a nice cash award of $700, plus other winning-related perks.

Grinnings and winnings.

"And one more thing -- I entered that event before. Twice over the past number of years. And made the semi-finals both times. So yes -- I was smiling pretty big on May 12. Still, I know what a crap shoot it all is, which helps me not take myself too seriously."

"A Hundred Years From Now" ranks 5th place and is voted onto The Alternate Root's 'Music for Social Change' Sampler! - April 21, 2010

Our song "A Hundred Years From Now" (co-written with Tom Prasada-Rao, and Track #9 on our newest Adler & Hearne release "To The Heart") was recently voted #5 from among 36 finalists out of more than 500 songs submitted for inclusion in The Alternate Root's 'Music for Social Change' Sampler.

 

The Alternate Root logo

The FREE sampler is up and ready to change the world! (no longer available that we can find -- but it was fun while it lasted!!)

The Alternate Root reports that they had 7500 votes. The Top 25 artists, which includes Adler & Hearne, join James McMurtry, Jason & The Scorchers, Christine Ohlman, The Boxmasters, Chip Taylor and Kasey Anderson in having their voices heard. Gary Allegretto reached the top slot with over 1400 votes with his song, "Four Days Late", featuring Ivan Neville. Adler & Hearne's song came in 5th in the voting!

The songs are available at TheAlternateRoot.com for streaming and download. To download the sampler, click to the following link. http://www.thealternateroot.com/music-for-social-change-free-sampler (again -- sorry, but this story and compilation are no longer archived at the alternate root site)

The Alt Root folks and all artists involved agree -- let's make this compilation viral. The world needs to hear what these artists have to say! (if we can ever find a way to create a link to this compilation -- we'll post it here)


Lindy Hearne honored with Top 20 spot on Wildflower Festival's Bud Light Singer-Songwriter Stage - April 16, 2010

Lindy Hearne was among the TOP 20 CONTESTANTS of the 2010 Wildflower Festival Performing Songwriter Contest, and has been invited to perform his songs on the Bud Light Stage (formerly the Acoustic Cafe Stage, next to the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts).

Joining him will be partner Lynn Adler, and Lindy's lead-guitar wielding daughter Kate Hearne who will be home from having completed her first year as a Commercial Music major in guitar at South Plains College in Levelland, Texas.

Adler & Hearne with special guest Kate Hearne are scheduled to go on at 3 PM for a 45-minute set. Please join us! ~ A&H

P.S. Tickets to the show are super easy to obtain. Just click to the festival web site -- www.wildflowerfestival.net -- go to Tickets, and everything you need to know to purchase online, and even to print at home to scan for entry at the festival -- it's all there. Easy as pie.

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